• UK’s Carbon Trust releases £1m of funding for low energy projects

    Materials World magazine
    The UK’s Carbon Trust has released £1 million of funding for seven new carbon technology projects. The Carbon Trust, an independent company funded by the UK Government to support the development of low carbon technologies, has announced one million pounds worth of funding for seven low carbon technology projects.
  • Polystyrene nanosphere dyes

    Polystyrene nanospheres replace toxic dyes to produce structural colours

    Materials World magazine
    With increasing concerns about the use of traditional dyes on the environment, materials that use polysytene nanospheres rather than toxic dyes to produce colour have been the subject of research by scientists at the University of Southampton, UK. The sphere size controls the wavelength which light is reflected and scattered from the film, offering new possibilities for structural colours. The materials have already attracted the interest of Unilever, Kodak, Merck and Degussa for applications ranging from packaging to automotives.
  • Flames

    Flame-retardant polymer

    Materials World magazine
    Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA, have created a flame-retardant synthetic polymer that does not require conventional and potentially harmful halogen additives. The team aims to apply the material in the interior of aircraft and ships.
  • Copper alloy moulds

    Copper increases efficiency in injection moulding

    Packaging Professional magazine
    Replacing traditional steel moulds with those made from copper alloys could make injection moulding of plastic packaging more productive, according to research led by UK-based Copperplas International Ltd. Project Aimtech aims to reduce cycle time and improve finish quality to increase competiveness with the rapidly developing Chinese supply chain. Copper alloy moulds are five to six times more thermally conductive than steel for injecting molten plastic at high pressure.
  • Natural fibre-based packaging

    Nanoclays modified with crustacean shells

    Packaging Professional magazine
    Scientists at Sheffield Hallam University, UK, have modified nanoclays with molecules from the shells of crustaceans and dispensed them in natural polymers, such as starch, to create natural fibre-based packaging a viable alternative to petroleum based-polymers. The research is part of the four-year European Sustainpack project bringing together packaging research associations, academia and industry from 13 European countries. The scheme, which is due to end in 2008, aims to encourage widespread use of biopolymers, paper and board for packaging.
  • Copper alloy moulds

    Copper increases efficiency in injection moulding

    Materials World magazine
    Replacing traditional steel moulds with those made from copper alloys could make injection moulding of plastic packaging more productive, according to research led by UK-based Copperplas International Ltd. Project Aimtech aims to reduce cycle time and improve finish quality to increase competiveness with the rapidly developing Chinese supply chain. Copper alloy moulds are five to six times more thermally conductive than steel for injecting molten plastic at high pressure.
  • MADE magazine

    MADE design magazine launched

    IOM3
    A new magazine, MADE, has been launched for the UK’s design and materials communities.
  • Electrospun silicone microthreads for regenerative medicine

    Materials World magazine
    The feasibility of electrospinning technology to produce polymeric threads containing viable brain cells, has been demonstrated by researchers at University College London, UK. The creation of biologically active threads and scaffolds of living organisms may have a range of bioengineering and medical applications.
  • Microwave curing of composites

    Materials World magazine
    Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology (ICT) in Pfinztal, Germany, have developed a microwave technique to cure large fibre-reinforced plastic composites components used in the shipbuilding, construction and energy industries. The approach could serve as an alternative to manual-lamination or die-casting methods, enabling polymer resins to be heated volumetrically in a more contolled process.
  • £50 million of funding for research and development projects

    IOM3
    A DTI competition for funding will distribute £50 million to collaborative research and development projects.

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