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  • Enhancing your career prospects: Getting Chartered without headaches

    For early career materials, minerals and mining scientists and engineers, the process towards Chartership may seem daunting and its benefits may not be initially obvious. To support the journey towards Chartership, the IOM3 Younger Members’ Committee (YMC) hosted a Chartership event with two key speakers.
  • Fusion materials

    Works are in place to advance the knowledge and ensure technology transfer of commercially viable nuclear fusion power plants.
  • Making a non-toxic wood glue

    Cambond Ltd Founder Xiaobin Zhao discusses how algae can replace formaldehyde resins in wood panel products.
  • The history of IOM3

    Take a look at how IOM3 has grown from the Iron and Steel Institute to become a representative body of more than 20 divisions in 2019.
  • Get talking – President’s message

    IOM3 President Serena Best highlights the need for collaboration and inclusivity as the Institute moves forward.
  • Get talking – CEO’s message

    IOM3 CEO Colin Church discusses the work ahead as the Institute strives to champion responsible materials development and waste management.
  • Making progress in polymers

    Polymers are changing, with developments focused on meeting our high demands while also addressing major global challenges in waste and recycling. IOM3 Polymer Society Divisional Board Chair, Stuart Patrick, discusses some ongoing projects.
  • The rise of composites

    British Composites Society Board members Professor Steve Eichhorn, Paul Shakspeare and Chair Dan Kells, discuss the rapid and relentless success of composites across UK industries.
  • Ireland exports wind energy, but coal, gas and peat relied on

    The emerald isle is choosing environmentally-friendly energy production methods, but peat remains a major source.
  • Dealing with plastic waste

    The amount of single-use plastic material littering the countryside, rivers, and oceans has stirred plenty of emotion in recent months. But, what can be done to change this? Stuart Patrick* investigates.

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