• Testing orthopaedic implants coated with carbon nanotubes

    Materials World magazine
    Orthopaedic implants that monitor the healing process and speed up bone growth may be achievable using carbon nanotubes, say researchers at Brown University in Providence, USA.
  • Non-stick coating reduces food waste, facilitates recycling

    Packaging Professional magazine
    Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institutes in Germany are using plasma processing technology and novel thin films to explore the potential for using non-stick packs in reducing food waste and making recycling easier.
  • Anti-corrosion technology for automotives with no heavy metals

    Materials World magazine
    International Ford Motor Company has developed an anti-corrosion coating that does not use heavy metals. The company claims the pre-treatment process is more efficient as it reduces water usage in automotive paint shops by half and decreases the production of waste sludge by 90%. The technique makes use of a zirconium oxide vehicle bath rather than the conventional heavy metal zinc phosphate bath
  • Polystyrene nanosphere dyes

    Polystyrene nanospheres replace toxic dyes to produce structural colours

    Packaging Professional magazine
    With increasing concerns about the use of traditional dyes on the environment, materials that use polysytene nanospheres rather than toxic dyes to produce colour have been the subject of research by scientists at the University of Southampton, UK. The sphere size controls the wavelength which light is reflected and scattered from the film, offering new possibilities for structural colours. The materials have already attracted the interest of Unilever, Kodak, Merck and Degussa for applications ranging from packaging to automotives.
  • UK’s Carbon Trust releases £1m of funding for low energy projects

    Materials World magazine
    The UK’s Carbon Trust has released £1 million of funding for seven new carbon technology projects. The Carbon Trust, an independent company funded by the UK Government to support the development of low carbon technologies, has announced one million pounds worth of funding for seven low carbon technology projects.
  • Clay nanoparticles enhance latex emulsion paints

    Materials World magazine
    Polymeric latex emulsion paints can be made more hardwearing and fire resistant by incorporating clay nanoparticles, according to research conducted at the University of Warwick, UK. These paints are applied as waterborne and automotive coatings, or as a binding material in cement, mortar, asphalt, carpet and paper.
  • Etched trench in silicon film

    Novel technique developed to grow semiconductors on silicon

    Materials World magazine
    AmberWave Systems, based in Salem, USA, has developed a novel technique to grow semiconductors, such as germanium, gallium arsenide and indium phosphide, on silicon. Researchers hope the method will lead to faster and smaller transistors, and cheaper lasers and photonic devices. Faster and smaller transistors are the key to extending Moore's Law - the chip industry axiom that predicts doubling the number of transistors in an integrated electronic circuit every two years will improve performance. The team has epitaxially grown non-silicon semiconductors through chemical vapour deposition.
  • Compound composite challenges

    Materials World magazine
    A EUREKA SURFAS project made up of French and Swiss researchers seeks to address the problems surrounding the use of sheet moulding compound (SMC) composites in automotives. The material could reduce the car's weight and decrease carbon emissions but their use has been limited due to cracks and blisters appearing on the surface of components.
  • Plasma-coated stent

    3D plasma coating technique prevents stents from clogging

    Materials World magazine
    Researchers at the University of Ulster, UK, have developed a 3D plasma coating technique to prevent stents from developing neointima, where thick muscle tissue grows over the surface, leading to the blood vessel narrowing again. Thin films of carbon, ceramics and platinum are coated using the new method to prevent clogging.
  • Polystyrene nanosphere dyes

    Polystyrene nanospheres replace toxic dyes to produce structural colours

    Materials World magazine
    With increasing concerns about the use of traditional dyes on the environment, materials that use polysytene nanospheres rather than toxic dyes to produce colour have been the subject of research by scientists at the University of Southampton, UK. The sphere size controls the wavelength which light is reflected and scattered from the film, offering new possibilities for structural colours. The materials have already attracted the interest of Unilever, Kodak, Merck and Degussa for applications ranging from packaging to automotives.

Pages