• Electronic paper displays from photonic crystals

    Materials World magazine
    P-Ink, a technology that employs photonic crystals and the light reflected between them to create flexible electronic-paper displays with improved colour and resolution, has been created by Opalux, a company based in Toronto, Canada.
  • Hydrogels for tissue regeneration

    Materials World magazine
    A novel peptide-based hydrogel that can be injected as a solid may one day be used to repair damaged human tissue, according to scientists at the University of Delaware, USA. The low viscosity gel could be used to deliver cells and pharmaceuticals.
  • Polymer fuel tanks to meet emission standards

    Materials World magazine
    The Polymer Processing Research Centre (PPRC) at Queen's University Belfast, UK, is researching multilayer polyamide and polyethylene fuel tanks that help motorcycle manufacturers meet stringent emission standards in the USA. Polymers also improve impact and corrosion resistance and are more cost effective that the metal fuel tanks, say researchers.
  • Polystyrene nanosphere dyes

    Polystyrene nanospheres replace toxic dyes to produce structural colours

    Packaging Professional magazine
    With increasing concerns about the use of traditional dyes on the environment, materials that use polysytene nanospheres rather than toxic dyes to produce colour have been the subject of research by scientists at the University of Southampton, UK. The sphere size controls the wavelength which light is reflected and scattered from the film, offering new possibilities for structural colours. The materials have already attracted the interest of Unilever, Kodak, Merck and Degussa for applications ranging from packaging to automotives.
  • UK’s Carbon Trust releases £1m of funding for low energy projects

    Materials World magazine
    The UK’s Carbon Trust has released £1 million of funding for seven new carbon technology projects. The Carbon Trust, an independent company funded by the UK Government to support the development of low carbon technologies, has announced one million pounds worth of funding for seven low carbon technology projects.
  • Compound composite challenges

    Materials World magazine
    A EUREKA SURFAS project made up of French and Swiss researchers seeks to address the problems surrounding the use of sheet moulding compound (SMC) composites in automotives. The material could reduce the car's weight and decrease carbon emissions but their use has been limited due to cracks and blisters appearing on the surface of components.
  • Polystyrene nanosphere dyes

    Polystyrene nanospheres replace toxic dyes to produce structural colours

    Materials World magazine
    With increasing concerns about the use of traditional dyes on the environment, materials that use polysytene nanospheres rather than toxic dyes to produce colour have been the subject of research by scientists at the University of Southampton, UK. The sphere size controls the wavelength which light is reflected and scattered from the film, offering new possibilities for structural colours. The materials have already attracted the interest of Unilever, Kodak, Merck and Degussa for applications ranging from packaging to automotives.
  • Flames

    Flame-retardant polymer

    Materials World magazine
    Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA, have created a flame-retardant synthetic polymer that does not require conventional and potentially harmful halogen additives. The team aims to apply the material in the interior of aircraft and ships.
  • Copper alloy moulds

    Copper increases efficiency in injection moulding

    Materials World magazine
    Replacing traditional steel moulds with those made from copper alloys could make injection moulding of plastic packaging more productive, according to research led by UK-based Copperplas International Ltd. Project Aimtech aims to reduce cycle time and improve finish quality to increase competiveness with the rapidly developing Chinese supply chain. Copper alloy moulds are five to six times more thermally conductive than steel for injecting molten plastic at high pressure.
  • Copper alloy moulds

    Copper increases efficiency in injection moulding

    Packaging Professional magazine
    Replacing traditional steel moulds with those made from copper alloys could make injection moulding of plastic packaging more productive, according to research led by UK-based Copperplas International Ltd. Project Aimtech aims to reduce cycle time and improve finish quality to increase competiveness with the rapidly developing Chinese supply chain. Copper alloy moulds are five to six times more thermally conductive than steel for injecting molten plastic at high pressure.

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