• Plastic food packagaging

    The future is clear

    Packaging Professional magazine
    The world's largest twin PET resin and amorphous PET (APET) sheet complex will open in April 2008. Manufacturing company Octal Holding, based in Salalah, Oman, says its 300,000t capacity plant will capitalise on growing demand for these packaging materials. ‘Over the last 10 years, there has been a migration away from paper/board into plastics, and, more recently, away from general plastics into clear ones,' says Nicholas Barakat, Managing Director of Octal. ‘The emerging substrate of choice is the same material that is used for bottled water and soft drinks - PET.'
  • Environmental debate on biopolymers and biodegradable plastics

    Packaging Professional magazine
    A seminar on Biopolymers and Biodegradable Plastics, in London, UK, on 3 October 2007, discussed the momentum for bioplastics and the reality of their environmental credentials.
  • A plastic bottle full of 'mermaid's tears'

    Environmental debate on biopolymers and biodegradable plastics

    Materials World magazine
    A seminar on Biopolymers and Biodegradable Plastics, in London, UK, on 3 October 2007, discussed the momentum for bioplastics and the reality of their environmental credentials.
  • Tax on packaging

    Packaging Professional magazine
    The Netherlands’ Ministry of Finance is to introduce a carbon-based tax on packaging from January 2008. The fee for packaging processors is likely to be levied according to a calculation of CO2 emissions from the production of each kilogramme of packaging.
  • Electronic paper displays from photonic crystals

    Materials World magazine
    P-Ink, a technology that employs photonic crystals and the light reflected between them to create flexible electronic-paper displays with improved colour and resolution, has been created by Opalux, a company based in Toronto, Canada.
  • Hydrogels for tissue regeneration

    Materials World magazine
    A novel peptide-based hydrogel that can be injected as a solid may one day be used to repair damaged human tissue, according to scientists at the University of Delaware, USA. The low viscosity gel could be used to deliver cells and pharmaceuticals.
  • Polymer fuel tanks to meet emission standards

    Materials World magazine
    The Polymer Processing Research Centre (PPRC) at Queen's University Belfast, UK, is researching multilayer polyamide and polyethylene fuel tanks that help motorcycle manufacturers meet stringent emission standards in the USA. Polymers also improve impact and corrosion resistance and are more cost effective that the metal fuel tanks, say researchers.
  • Polystyrene nanosphere dyes

    Polystyrene nanospheres replace toxic dyes to produce structural colours

    Packaging Professional magazine
    With increasing concerns about the use of traditional dyes on the environment, materials that use polysytene nanospheres rather than toxic dyes to produce colour have been the subject of research by scientists at the University of Southampton, UK. The sphere size controls the wavelength which light is reflected and scattered from the film, offering new possibilities for structural colours. The materials have already attracted the interest of Unilever, Kodak, Merck and Degussa for applications ranging from packaging to automotives.
  • UK’s Carbon Trust releases £1m of funding for low energy projects

    Materials World magazine
    The UK’s Carbon Trust has released £1 million of funding for seven new carbon technology projects. The Carbon Trust, an independent company funded by the UK Government to support the development of low carbon technologies, has announced one million pounds worth of funding for seven low carbon technology projects.
  • Compound composite challenges

    Materials World magazine
    A EUREKA SURFAS project made up of French and Swiss researchers seeks to address the problems surrounding the use of sheet moulding compound (SMC) composites in automotives. The material could reduce the car's weight and decrease carbon emissions but their use has been limited due to cracks and blisters appearing on the surface of components.

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