News

Heating up austenitic stainless steels

Materials World magazine
Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA, claim to have developed inexpensive austenitic stainless steels that can withstand higher temperatures while maintaing creep strength and oxidation resistance by introducing aluminium into composition. The drive towards higher operating temperatures, while maintaining creep stremnght and oxidation resistance by introducing aluminium into its composition. that employ austenitic stainless steels in turbine recuperators, heat exchangers, piping and tubing.
Plasma-coated stent

3D plasma coating technique prevents stents from clogging

Materials World magazine
Researchers at the University of Ulster, UK, have developed a 3D plasma coating technique to prevent stents from developing neointima, where thick muscle tissue grows over the surface, leading to the blood vessel narrowing again. Thin films of carbon, ceramics and platinum are coated using the new method to prevent clogging.
Supraspheres

Mouldable metals' created using nanocrystals

Materials World magazine
A method of assembling metal nanoparticles into a clay-like structure that can be moulded and fired has been developed by researchers at Northwestern University, Chicago, USA. Paternal applications include flexible electronics.
Biometric laser scanner

Biometric fingerprints for anti-counterfeiting

Packaging Professional magazine
ProteXXion, launched by Bayer Technology Services in Germany, is a security and tracking device that uses the biometric fingerprints of individual surfaces to counter fraud in items ranging from packaging to passports. ProteXXion encompasses project management, installation and servicing of the laser surface authentication (LSA) technology invented at Imperial College London, UK. Laser surface authentification combined with RFID tracking device tags could provide an all-encompassing anti-fraud solution. Trials have been conducted on pharmaceutical and tobacco packaging using static scannes on production lines that move up to four metres per second.
Polystyrene nanosphere dyes

Polystyrene nanospheres replace toxic dyes to produce structural colours

Materials World magazine
With increasing concerns about the use of traditional dyes on the environment, materials that use polysytene nanospheres rather than toxic dyes to produce colour have been the subject of research by scientists at the University of Southampton, UK. The sphere size controls the wavelength which light is reflected and scattered from the film, offering new possibilities for structural colours. The materials have already attracted the interest of Unilever, Kodak, Merck and Degussa for applications ranging from packaging to automotives.

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