Naveen Tiwari - Singapore

Naveen received his Master of Technology in Materials Science and Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India, in 2015. His masters project focused on the crosslinking of biodegradable polymers. He developed a novel method to increase the interfacial interaction between poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) and cellulose. He developed azide-alkynyl cycloaddition reaction to covalently link PVA and cellulose. With a taste of polymers and chemistry in the background has inspired to work in the field of healable flexible materials for next generation electronic devices like E-skin.

Naveen started his PhD under the supervision of Professor Nripan Mathews in August 2015. His PhD focusses on investigating the self-healing flexible and transparent materials for electronic devices. Self-healing systems empower the field of electronics which has taken it into a new generation electronics in the application of wearable electronics. He was also the recipient of the Nanyang Technological University Research Scholarship (ongoing) and qualified GATE examination and in 2013 he was awarded the MHRD Scholarship, Govt. of India during his Master of Technology.

Apart from improving his skill in academia, Naveen has tried to hone his interpersonal and leadership skills. At present, he holds the portfolio of the Residential Mentor (RM) of Hall 3, NTU, Singapore. He also held the position of Treasurer during the 2016-17 academic year, and Sports Secretary during 2017-18, at the Materials Science and Engineering Graduate Students' Club, NTU Singapore. Apart from playing a vital role on organising committees for various successful academic events hosted by MSE-NTU and interacting with eminent researchers, Naveen has also contributed to student welfare through fundraising, mentoring and clean campus initiatives. Apart from travelling and listening to musing, Naveen is very fond of cricket and badminton.

Self-healable and flexible materials for next generation electronic devices: Smart materials

Self-healing, flexible, transparent electrodes could transform the way of fabrication of electronic devices in future. Challenges associated with mechanical fracture of electrical conductors has hindered the realisation of truly flexible, robust and high performance wearable electronics. The remarkable achievements in transparent and flexible electrodes have raised widespread interest in research groups in flexible electronics, owing to their low cost fabrication, easy scale up and unique properties.

However, they still suffer from innate problems like mechanical rupture, scratching and bending torsion because of their 'soft' and flexible nature related to their solid counterparts. Hence, self-healing capability would be highly desirable for these electrodes in flexible electronic devices. Self-healing systems empower the field of electronics which has taken it into a new generation of electronics in the application of wearable electronics. The ongoing state of the art is where research has demonstrated self-healing polymeric layers with conducting materials as top electrodes to form self-healing conducting systems.

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