In memoriam: An appreciation of past members

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This page lists member obituaries. If you would like to contribute an obituary of an IOM3 member to be published here, please contact obituaries@iom3.org. Notifications of members who have passed away should be sent to membership@iom3.org.

Donald McLean was one of the greats of physical metallurgy and structural integrity who will be forever remembered in the annals of physical metallurgy among those leading the transformation of the discipline from a qualitative metallurgical art to a quantitative materials science

Jim Charles was resolutely a metallurgist interested in industrial processes and, through his intuitive understanding of the subject, he also made important contributions to archaeometallurgy

Les Erasmus was a recognised national and international authority on the role of nitrogen, microalloying and dual phase effects in structural and specialty steels

Keith Atkinson was a renowned geologist who also had a great interest in mineral processing

Arthur Brace was known as the Father of Anodizing and was instrumental in founding the International Hard Anodizing Association and the Aluminum Anodizers Council in the USA.

Professor Hepburn, a stalwart supporter of the IOM3 Rubber in Engineering Group and a major figure in the UK rubber community, passed away on 18 January 2017

Mr K M Philip played a key role in the post-war transformation of the rubber industry in India and remained active on several company boards until the age of 102

Claude and Lyn outside 10 Downing Street

Claude Hepburn, a stalwart of the IOM3 Rubber in Engineering Group who made a vast contribution to the rubber community, died in January aged 81.

Professor Ernest Hondros, a British materials scientist, innovator, leader, and friend to many, spent much of his working life at the National Physical Laboratory and did much to promote materials science research nationally and internationally.

Philip Beckley worked in the electrical steels industry for almost 40 years and his contribution to the technology earned him international renown both within the industry and in academia.

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