• Wrapped in shellfish

    Materials World magazine
    A new material made from food waste could be a biodegradable alternative for food packaging, as Ellis Davies reports.
  • Problem-solving biomimicry

    Materials World magazine
    Flat bark bugs, lizards, camels and tide pools have inspired the latest research in mimicking nature, bringing this problem-solving into engineering and medicine. Ines Nastali reports.
  • Patent of the month: Feel the buzz

    Materials World magazine
    This month, Dr Jennifer Unsworth, Patent Attorney at intellectual property law firm Withers and Rogers, looks at a patent that improves cathode technology.
  • Get talking: Asbestos still affects people 20 years after ban

    Materials World magazine
    Abestos has been banned in the UK for nearly 20 years, but it’s still killing thousands of people every year as it sometimes can’t be removed from buildings, Nick Pullan, Asbestos Surveyor for Alpha Surveys, warns.
  • Getting to the grain of it

    Materials World magazine
    The Wood Awards 2018 shortlist has been released, featuring entries including whisky distilleries, the UK Royal Academy of Music, and mycelium light shades. Khai Trung Le reports.
  • They came from outer space

    Materials World magazine
    The University of Glasgow has co-developed a device that uses muons to detect radiation. Khai Trung Le talks to Dr Craig Shearer on its development.
  • 3D-printed guns: fad or threat?

    Materials World magazine
    As digital blueprints for 3D-printed guns cause controversy in the USA, Kathryn Allen looks at the danger these weapons pose.
  • Timber house design to push sustainable building

    Materials World magazine
    Researchers around the world are seeking ways to make buildings more efficient and less dependent on emissions-intensive materials. This MIT project using timber is no exception.
  • Copper band illuminates ancient trade routes

    Materials World magazine
    The exchange of goods and knowledge between ancient Native Americans stretched further than previously thought, as Ellis Davies reports.
  • Common water phenomenon gets an explanation

    Materials World magazine
    The theory of hydraulic jumps, which is over 200 years old, has been debunked, as Ellis Davies reports.

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