• A look back at 2018

    IOM3
    Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from all of us at the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining. Our offices will close for the Christmas break at 5pm on Friday 21 December and reopen at 9am on Tuesday 2 January 2019.
  • A waste disaster avoided

    Materials World magazine
    Waste left over from aid efforts following disasters can produce a large amount of plastic pollution. Ellis Davies reports on a new study into ways to deal with it.
  • Pursuing the smart factory

    Materials World magazine
    Dr Cinzia Giannetti, Senior Lecturer of Engineering at Swansea University, UK, talks about her smart factory project and collaboration with packaging manufacturer, Crown.
  • Animal chatter speeds up material testing

    Materials World magazine
    Sonar techniques can characterise soft materials at high speeds and with greater accuracy.
  • The black widow's steel strength web

    Materials World magazine
    Understanding how black widow spiders transform proteins into fibres as strong as steel may help scientists create strong synthetic materials. Idha Valeur reports.
  • World premiere of the first 3D-printed steel bridge

    Materials World magazine
    The world’s first 3D-printed steel bridge previously featured in Materials World has now been completed, with a digital twin, and was unveiled at Dutch Design Week. Idha Valeur reports.
  • New process for bark utilisation

    Materials World magazine
    A new process for extracting tannins from softwood bark has been discovered, making it possible to use the full material. Idha Valeur reports.
  • How a mantis shrimp packs a punch

    Materials World magazine
    Robotics could be improved with super strength shrimp design. Ceri Jones reports.
  • Shape memory alloy reinforces building

    Materials World magazine
    A new shape-memory alloy that only requires one pre-stressing could improve civil engineering. Ceri Jones reports.
  • How we talk about plastics

    Materials World magazine
    Plastics can be recyclable, compostable biodegradeable – but what do these really mean? Stuart Patrick breaks down single-use plastics.

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