• 2008 Institute Awards and Prizes open for nominations

    IOM3
    The 2008 Institute Awards and Prizes are open for nominations.
  • Polystyrene nanosphere dyes

    Polystyrene nanospheres replace toxic dyes to produce structural colours

    Packaging Professional magazine
    With increasing concerns about the use of traditional dyes on the environment, materials that use polysytene nanospheres rather than toxic dyes to produce colour have been the subject of research by scientists at the University of Southampton, UK. The sphere size controls the wavelength which light is reflected and scattered from the film, offering new possibilities for structural colours. The materials have already attracted the interest of Unilever, Kodak, Merck and Degussa for applications ranging from packaging to automotives.
  • Porous carbons

    Characterising porous carbons

    Materials World magazine
    Quantachrome Instruments, based in Boynton Beach, Florida, USA, has launched a novel pore size calculation tool for porous carbons and activated carbon fibres. The quenched solid density functional theory is designed to take into account surface roughness and chemical hetrogenity and could be used for energy storage, supercapacitors, carbon dioxide capture and sequestration and gas seperation.
  • Heating up austenitic stainless steels

    Materials World magazine
    Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA, claim to have developed inexpensive austenitic stainless steels that can withstand higher temperatures while maintaing creep strength and oxidation resistance by introducing aluminium into composition. The drive towards higher operating temperatures, while maintaining creep stremnght and oxidation resistance by introducing aluminium into its composition. that employ austenitic stainless steels in turbine recuperators, heat exchangers, piping and tubing.
  • New quantum dots can amplify light for tunable lasers

    Materials World magazine
    Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, USA, have engineered a new version of quantum dots (semiconductor nanocrystals) that can amplify light for cheaper and tunable lasers at a range of wavelenghts at a range of wavelengths.
  • Polystyrene nanosphere dyes

    Polystyrene nanospheres replace toxic dyes to produce structural colours

    Materials World magazine
    With increasing concerns about the use of traditional dyes on the environment, materials that use polysytene nanospheres rather than toxic dyes to produce colour have been the subject of research by scientists at the University of Southampton, UK. The sphere size controls the wavelength which light is reflected and scattered from the film, offering new possibilities for structural colours. The materials have already attracted the interest of Unilever, Kodak, Merck and Degussa for applications ranging from packaging to automotives.
  • Safety films for batteries

    Materials World magazine
    Electrode separators made from porous polymers that help prevent lithium-ion batteries from exploding at high temperatures have been created by Tonen Chemical Corporation, in Japan. This could help use of batteries in hyybrid and electric vehicles.
  • Supraspheres

    Mouldable metals' created using nanocrystals

    Materials World magazine
    A method of assembling metal nanoparticles into a clay-like structure that can be moulded and fired has been developed by researchers at Northwestern University, Chicago, USA. Paternal applications include flexible electronics.
  • Printed circuit-board inspection made easier

    Materials World magazine
    The Microscan AOI, developed within the EU Framework 6 programme, combines four different techniques to inspect printed circuit boards for defects during production. These are automated optical inspection, scanning acoustic microscopy, thermography, and X-ray inspection.
  • image

    Single-phase bulk solids heat management

    Materials World magazine
    Scientists at the IBM T J Watson Research Center and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, both in the USA, are exploring the optical and thermal electric properties of new composite materials that harness the properties of multiple semiconductors in one superlatice material using different nanocrystal combinations to be used in the recovery of waste heat.

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