2020 YPLC - LMS LOCAL HEAT

6 Feb 2020
London

London Materials Society Young Person's Lecture Competition Local Heat

 

The LMS invites students and professionals up to the age of 28 will deliver a 15 minute lecture on a topic related to materials, minerals, mining, packaging, clay technology and wood science. 

The selected Candidate will compete in the regional final held in London. Competitors must be 28 or under on 1 June 2020. 

For more information on the competition, visit the YPLC page on this website

 

Abstracts

COMPARATIVE NON-INVASIVE ANALYSES OF MINIATURE VOTIVE VESSELS FROM SPARTA’S ‘ACHILLEION

 Kutsi Dorukan Akcicek, from Imperial College London

The 1907 excavation of Sparta by the British School at Athens discovered a small sanctuary, noting that it could be the ‘Achilleion’ mentioned by Pausanias. Close to 10,000 miniature vases, used as offerings to gods, were discovered and 12 are now within the collection of the Ure Museum of Greek Archaeology at the University of Reading. There has been a lack of scientific study on Laconian pottery since 1982, however advances in characterisation have seen portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF) being used on artifacts. This study went one step further and coupled it with environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), producing a chemical fingerprint for Sparta. The results showed variability in the oxide compositions which this study wishes to explain through scientific explanations including the variation of soil composition and the effects of burial but also through Classical explanations including the manufacturing and use of the votives.

 

 

 ENHANCED EFFICIENCY OF OXYGEN REDUCTION REACTION ELECTROCATALYSTS

BY ENGINEERING OF THE TRIPLE-POINT INTERFACE 

 Silvia Favero, from Imperial College London

Pollutants reduction and noise abatement are only two of the several advantages that make hydrogen fuel cells a promising candidate, in the pursuit of a sustainable transport sector.

However, the commercialization of this technology is hindered by the sluggish kinetic of the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction and by the requirement of expensive and unsustainable platinum-based catalysts. Consequently, precious-metal-free catalysts have been intensively studied and metal-nitrogen catalysts have been identified as the most promising candidates.

However, the efficiency achievable by catalyst engineering is restrained by mass-transfer limitations and novel approaches are needed to overcome this threshold. In my PhD I investigate a new concept of engineering the electrochemical interface, between the solid catalyst, liquid electrolyte and gaseous reactant. This approach is based on the deposition of oxygenophilic and hydrophobic ionic liquids on the surface of the catalyst, obtaining a simultaneous improvement in reactant concentration and product expulsion at the interface.

 

 

 MULTI-FUNCTIONAL SELF-POWERED SENSORS BASED ON THERMOELECTRIC EFFECT

 Kening Wan, from Queen Mary University of London

With the development of intelligent terminals, smart devices have attracted interest in both academic and industrial fields. Most of them rely on rigid batteries, which require frequent charging and/or replacement and limit their potential applications. Thermoelectric effect can be a robust and reliable power source, particularly in off-the-grid and maintenance-free applications.

Herein, the potential solution to develop autonomous, self-powered devices is presented, [1] exploiting the thermoelectric effect of polymer composites based on poly-nickel-ethenetetrathiolates and poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). Additionally, polymeric systems are beneficial to achieving highly stretchable device. Therefore, a novel ultrasensitive self-powered sensor based on patterned PEDOT:PSS coated elastic yarns are also reported. It shows ultrahigh sensitivity (gauge factor ~ 49000 under 50 % - 200 % strain) combined with large stretchability (~1000%), with Seebeck coefficient retain 15 μV K-1 . Highly stretchable yarns could generate sufficient thermopower for ultra-sensitive sensing temperature and strain, when subjected to a small temperature difference (< 20 ̊C).

 

 SOLID-STATE PROTONS: HOW TO FIND HIDDEN IONS

Nicholas Williams, from Imperial College London

Finding a needle in a haystack is a challenging, seemingly impossible task. Now, try to locate the position of a proton in an ionic crystal, and you will find that it is even more testing. Most solid-oxide energy devices operate via oxide-ion migration across an electronically insulating electrolyte. However, oxide-ions are relatively large and require a neighbouring vacant lattice site for an atomic jump to occur.

Protons can be introduced into a solid-oxide lattice as an additional charge-carrier. The absence of an electron shell allows protons to occupy interstitial sites, thus making the transport of protons in crystalline materials extraordinarily fast relative to oxide-ions. By virtue, the properties which make these tiny ions so mobile also make them problematic to study. This lecture will discuss the transport model for protons in solid-oxide materials, and how ion beams have been used to characterise their transport properties.

 

 

 PRODUCTION OF ADVANCED WOUND CARE BANDAGES USING COMBINED MATERIALS FORMING TECHNIQUES.

Jubair Ahmed, from University College London

 

The cost of wound care for healthcare providers marks a significant portion of overall expenditure. With rise in global population and life expectancy, there is a growing pressure for the development of advanced wound care that can prevent the spread of infection and improve the quality of healing. Here we present the combination of pressurized gyration, a materials forming technique allowing for the rapid production of micro and nanofibers, with electrospinning, which is capable of precision deposition of functional therapeutic fibrous patches as a wound healing deposit. Together, these manufacturing techniques allow for the production of a new generation of advanced wound repair biomaterials that provide better healing rates and protection against common microbial infections. In this lecture, the audience will be introduced to fibres in wound healing, the major technologies behind them, antimicrobial bandages produced by them and how they can be combined to form advanced wound care.

 

TIME

5.30pm - Tea/Coffee
6.00pm - Lecture competition
7.30pm - Buffet

 

Downloadable documents: 

Venue and booking

Event Location: 
The Institute of Materials, Minerals & Mining
297 Euston Road
London
NW1 3AD
United Kingdom
Contact details: 

Patrick Pryce

pnpryce@gmail.com

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