• Announcement of the IOM3 Awards 2018

    IOM3
    Congratulations to the winners of the IOM3 Awards 2018.
  • Power in patterns

    Materials World magazine
    A Japanese basket weaving pattern could produce dissipationless devices, as Ellis Davies reports.
  • Nutrient filled graphene

    Materials World magazine
    Graphene loaded with nutrients can be used to create a more effective slow release fertiliser. Ellis Davies reports.
  • Moss on the roof

    Materials World magazine
    A holiday home in Norway clad in different materials combines functionality with the comfort of an evening in front of the fire. Ines Nastali reports.
  • Six finalists announced for Design Innovation in Plastics competition

    IOM3
    Students from universities all around the UK and Ireland have created innovative new products to make gardening easier, as they contest the 2018 Design Innovation in Plastics competition.
  • Women into Fellowship - Q&A

    IOM3
    As part of its ongoing Membership Growth Initiative, the Institute is pleased to announce the launch of its latest project – Women into Fellowship. Through this initiative IOM3 will be encouraging appropriately experienced women members and other women within the Materials Cycle communities to apply for the IOM3 Fellowship grade. To understand more about this project, we caught up with Ian Bowbrick, the Institute’s Director of Professional Development and Membership.
  • CURRENT STATUS OF TITANIUM ALLOY RESEARCH IN THE UK

    IOM3
    The Titanium Information Group is looking to host a workshop event later in 2018 to showcase R&D on Titanium in the UK.
  • Calling time at IOM3

    IOM3
    Dr Bernie Rickinson, IOM3 Chief Executive, has confirmed to Trustees and the principal boards of the Institute his intent to retire from the Institute at the end of 2018.
  • Hidden superconductivity revealed

    Materials World magazine
    A hidden state of superconductivity has been discovered, taking research a step closer to the design of superconductors at room temperature. Kathryn Allen reports.
  • Diamond anvils lead to first chemical reactions by mechanical pressure

    Materials World magazine
    The use of diamond molecular anvils in the first chemical reactions by mechanical pressure could lead to a new field of mechanosynthesis. Khai Trung Le reports.

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