• Natural fibre-based packaging

    Nanoclays modified with crustacean shells

    Packaging Professional magazine
    Scientists at Sheffield Hallam University, UK, have modified nanoclays with molecules from the shells of crustaceans and dispensed them in natural polymers, such as starch, to create natural fibre-based packaging a viable alternative to petroleum based-polymers. The research is part of the four-year European Sustainpack project bringing together packaging research associations, academia and industry from 13 European countries. The scheme, which is due to end in 2008, aims to encourage widespread use of biopolymers, paper and board for packaging.
  • smart' ski jacket

    Materials Resource Centre opens

    IOM3
    MADE, the materials and design node of the Materials KTN, has opened a Materials Resource Centre in central London.
  • New 'extralibral' composite 'stiffer than diamond'

    Materials World magazine
    Researchers have created a new ‘extralibral' composite made from molten tin and the barium titanate mineral that may replace diamond as the world's stiffest material.
  • MADE magazine

    MADE design magazine launched

    IOM3
    A new magazine, MADE, has been launched for the UK’s design and materials communities.
  • Materials for a Modern World report published

    IOM3
    Materials UK has published a report entitled 'What's the Future Made Of? Materials for a Modern World'.
  • Lightweight, polymeric composite for protective clothing

    Materials World magazine
    A lightweight, breathable composite to protect military personnel and employees in the chemical industry has been developed by TDA Research Inc and the University of Colorado, USA, based on a combination of butyl rubber and liquid crystals. The polymer membrane obtained can be laminated onto fabrics to protect clothing against exposure to toxic chemicals.
  • Prizes available for published work

    IOM3
    Acta, a non-profit organisation of which IOM3 is a cooperating society, has established the Student Award.
  • Microwave curing of composites

    Materials World magazine
    Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology (ICT) in Pfinztal, Germany, have developed a microwave technique to cure large fibre-reinforced plastic composites components used in the shipbuilding, construction and energy industries. The approach could serve as an alternative to manual-lamination or die-casting methods, enabling polymer resins to be heated volumetrically in a more contolled process.
  • £50 million of funding for research and development projects

    IOM3
    A DTI competition for funding will distribute £50 million to collaborative research and development projects.
  • Cars, components and composites – special edition Institute journal

    IOM3
    The automotive sector has a dedicated special issue in the international journal Plastics, Rubber and Composites.

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