Khai Trung Le

Country report: Canada

Materials World magazine
Canada faces difficult choices as it balances energy security and emission reduction targets with its oil-friendly expeditions. Khai Trung Le reports.

Church and university speak out against the North Sea

Materials World magazine
Following dissent from the University of Edinburgh and the Church of Scotland, Khai Trung Le looks at support for the North Sea within the country.

Journey to the centre of the Earth

Materials World magazine
Exploiting the inexhaustible heat supply from the Earth’s core requires tools and materials that can withstand extreme conditions. Khai Trung Le looks at solutions from the DESCRAMBLE project.

The future of nuclear lies renewable success

Materials World magazine
As more and more countries persist with the shift away from nuclear, the sector may find an unlikely ally in renewable energy. Khai Trung Le talks to Audun Botterud on the promise of flexible nuclear.

Have we finally found industrial graphene manufacture?

Materials World magazine
MIT joins the ranks with claims of a continuous, high-quality and scalable means of manufacturing graphene. Khai Trung Le reports.

The value of dematerialisation

Materials World magazine
Dematerialisation – the reduction of materials in products and services – may become a key tenet in the circular economy. But how do you define it, and how can materials science and industry benefit? Khai Trung Le reports.

Blockchain’s coal addiction

Materials World magazine
Khai Trung Le looks at the meteoric rise of bitcoin and blockchain processes, and the coal sources that fuel that success.

Slavery in brick manufacture

Clay Technology magazine
Khai Trung Le looks at the use of satellite imagery to track slavery in brick manufacturing.

The catalogue of risk

Clay Technology magazine
A new methodology to establish the connection between construction material and a building’s habitability after an earthquake hopes to promote superior city planning. Khai Trung Le reports.

Man of cellulose

Materials World magazine
Nano-sized cellulose has been deemed the strongest building material by KTH.

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