• ACE UK calls for ambitious UK targets

    The Alliance for Beverage Cartons and the Environment (ACE) UK has welcomed the final adoption of the revised EU Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive as a strong foundation on which member states can build towards a circular economy.
  • Tungsten too brittle for nuclear fusion reactors

    Researchers find tungsten – a favoured choice of metal within nuclear reactors – is liable to become brittle, leading to failure.
  • Encouraging plastic recycling

    Greater incentive is needed to realise the potential of plastics recycling, as Ellis Davies reports.
  • Blockchain’s coal addiction

    Khai Trung Le looks at the meteoric rise of bitcoin and blockchain processes, and the coal sources that fuel that success.
  • The value of dematerialisation

    Dematerialisation – the reduction of materials in products and services – may become a key tenet in the circular economy. But how do you define it, and how can materials science and industry benefit? Khai Trung Le reports.
  • The travelling potters

    Mankind has known travel and relocating for work for thousands of years, as the tales of women from the Baltic selling clay pottery in the Nordic countries tell. Ines Nastali reports
  • Have we finally found industrial graphene manufacture?

    MIT joins the ranks with claims of a continuous, high-quality and scalable means of manufacturing graphene. Khai Trung Le reports.
  • Patent of the month: sun-soaked

    With homeowners looking to microgeneration and renewable energy as means of reducing their energy bills, nanomaterial could help to make this more viable. Dr Jennifer Unsworth, Patent Attorney at law firm Withers & Rogers, reports
  • The future of nuclear lies renewable success

    As more and more countries persist with the shift away from nuclear, the sector may find an unlikely ally in renewable energy. Khai Trung Le talks to Audun Botterud on the promise of flexible nuclear.
  • Get talking: The challenge of materials

    Ben Walsh, Lead Technologist in Advanced Materials at Innovate UK, discusses how perspectives of innovation have changed, and how this affects materials scientists.

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